Online English Club
Welcome speech: Akmal Akbarov
When the quarantine measures were introduced in my country, I started teaching all of my students online. Keeping them engaged was the most challenging aspect of online teaching. So what I did to ensure my students were busy trying to improve their English was to handpick some of the most interesting, trending and educational YouTube videos and create mini-tasks. The effect was fantastic! Not only did they improve their English, but they also discovered the world around them and enlarged their worldview. I kept these videos and quizzes locked for a year, but only now decided to make them all public so that you can use them either to learn or teach English. Enjoy!

Important! Some quizzes might contain minor mistakes. Please excuse me for that. I will improve everything step by step.

About quizzes: All the quizzes contain multiple-choice questions. Once you have watched a particular video and completed the quiz, please press the Submit button. Then press the View score button in order to see your overall score and mistakes. You can do the quizzes several times.

About videos: Most of the videos last from 15 to 20 minutes and are mostly suitable for Intermediate level students. Feel free to watch the videos several times before completing the quiz.

No shows, no slots, no visitors: Coronavirus devastates Las Vegas
The covid-19 lockdown in Las Vegas has taken a heavy toll on the city's entertainment and hospitality industries, and hundreds of thousands are out of work.

Why middle class kids get the best jobs
Elvis, from Dagenham, is a working class lad who had his sights set on becoming a trader in the City. During his time at Birmingham University, Elvis got a 2:1 in political economy, becoming the first member of his family to get a degree. His mother, who used to clean the Morgan Stanley offices, wanted her son to get a job there.

Drones are growing into a $100 billion industry
Unmanned flying vehicles are growing in popularity all over the world. The technology is developing quickly with drones able to fly further and carry ever heavier payloads. But will the skies above our heads be safe? CNBC's David Reid investigates.

Silicon Valley billionaires created AltSchool
Silicon Valley is working on ways to change the way that we drive, eat, live, and now thanks to a new type of school, the way our children learn. The school is called AltSchool, and it's the brainchild of a former Google executive, Max Ventilla. The school merges traditional education with the type of high-tech learning that you would expect from Silicon Valley.

Japan's independent kids
By Western standards, Japanese culture emphasises independence and self-reliance from an extraordinarily young age.

How Much Do Traffic Jams Cost The U.S. Economy?
If you're like the 76% of Americans who drive to work alone, you've probably commuted in stop-and-go traffic with no end in sight. Then, when the road finally clears, you realize there was no reason for traffic to be stopped in the first place.

This School Locks Up Students' Phones
With the help of tech start-up Yondr, San Lorenzo High School in California has banned cellphone use during the school day.

Robot spy gorilla infiltrates a wild gorilla troop
While a young mountain gorilla just wants to play with our Spy Gorilla will the Silverback be so welcoming? Our Spy Creatures investigate the extraordinary wildlife that thrives in the tropics and the events and gatherings that happen across the year.

Inside Hong Kong's cage homes
Hong Kong is the most expensive housing market in the world. It has been ranked as the least affordable housing market on Earth for eight years in a row, and the price per square foot seems to be only going up. The inflated prices are forcing Hongkongers to squeeze into unconventionally small spaces that can affect their quality of life.

Learning robots: poised for universality?
Meet the remarkable iCub that learns like a child, and can share its expertise with others with a potential to create a collective pre-installed skill set for future generations.

Why Cuban cab drivers earn more than doctors
Cuba's economy works as a central planning model, where government ministries dole out resources and set everything from prices to inventories to salaries. The fact that a taxi driver can make so much more than a physician is a reflection of the Cuban government's heavy focus on tourism.

What it really means to be 'Made in China'
What does it mean to be 'Made in China?' As supply chains grow increasingly global, the answer is rarely simple. CNBC's Uptin Saiidi reports from the world's two largest economies.

Why is Singapore so rich?
Singapore is a tiny country, but it's managed to become an Asian economic hub. CNBC's Xin En Lee explains how the country went from third world to first world.

Take a tour inside Tesla's first Gigafactory
Tesla's Gigafactory in Nevada is expected to be the largest building in the world by footprint once completed. CNBC's Uptin Saiidi gets a rare look inside what Tesla founder Elon Musk calls, 'the machine that builds the machine.'

The internet's second revolution
L.O. Two simple letters that marked one of the biggest changes in human history. In 1969 programmers were trying to type "login".

What is the cloud?
The cloud is big business for tech giants like Amazon, Google and Microsoft. Revenues from cloud services are expected to exceed $200 billion in 2019. But what exactly does the cloud do? CNBC's Elizabeth Schulze explains.

Superblocks: How Barcelona is taking city streets back from cars
Modern cities are designed for cars. But the city of Barcelona is testing out an urban design trick that can give cities back to pedestrians.

We went inside Alibaba's global headquarters
From facial recognition security to unmanned vehicles, Alibaba's corporate campus is the office of the future. CNBC's Uptin Saiidi gets a rare look inside the company's headquarters in Hangzhou, China, where more than 20,000 employees are based.

Why Japan has so many vending machines
While in Japan I noticed vending machines everywhere. Looking into it a little deeper a discovered that there's a very interesting answer to why Japan has so many vending machines. It's an economic story but it's also a story about how Japanese society values robotics and automation.

This travel enthusiast skipped a corporate job, but still makes six figures
Drew Binsky went from teaching English to becoming a professional video maker. CNBC's Uptin Saiidi finds out how he did it in under two years and convinced his parents to accept his non traditional career path.

No tech, no talking: Can I survive a three-day digital detox?
What is it like to fast for three days without any technology or devices? CNBC's Uptin Saiidi took on the challenge, as he goes on a quest to learn more about tech addiction and the billion dollar mindfulness industry hoping to combat it.

The reality of working for Facebook
Facebook is a company that has grown from nothing to be worth half a trillion dollars in just 15 years. Today nearly a third of all humans are using it, and yet we rarely get to see the people actually in charge of the biggest social network in the world.

Is Google a monopoly?
Google has been fined record-breaking amounts by the European Commission for violating antitrust rules. Is Google a monopoly that needs to be broken up? CNBC's Elizabeth Schulze explains from Brussels.

Inside Samsung's global headquarters in South Korea
You may know Samsung for its smartphones and household appliances, but how about its insurance arm or holiday resorts? CNBC's Uptin Saiidi gets a rare look inside the headquarters of one of the world's largest companies.

Why is Apple so expensive?
Apple products have never been cheap but the cost of many of its gadgets has increased dramatically over time. So what makes Apple's products so pricey? CNBC's Uptin Saiidi explains.
Made on
Tilda